Home / Insights / Employment Tribunal For Woman Who Wore ‘See-Through Trousers’ To Work

Employment Tribunal For Woman Who Wore ‘See-Through Trousers’ To Work

A prison teacher has begun an Employment Tribunal claim for unfair dismissal and sexual discrimination, after bosses accused her of wearing inappropriate attire and posting ‘sexualised’ images on her website.

A prison teacher has begun an Employment Tribunal claim for unfair dismissal and sexual discrimination, after bosses accused her of wearing inappropriate attire and posting ‘sexualised’ images on her website.

Faye Bray was dismissed in January of this year from her teaching role at Brinsford Jail in Wolverhampton where she is alleged to have worn see-through trousers to work, leading one inmate to describe himself as having been ‘mesmerised’.

Governor Stephanie Roberts-Bibby also said that the 30-year old teacher had put up pictures on her website of her posing provocatively and holding a whip.

She said: “I didn’t think it was appropriate for Mrs Bray to be displaying such material on a website. I am very keen that we don’t do anything to reinforce negative stereotypes they may have, not just of women, but of any group.”

Mrs Bray denies wearing see-through clothing claiming it was merely white. She said: “I never wore see-through trousers. I think all the ladies in the room will agree we like to wear white trousers in the summer.”

She also accused one of her bosses of threatening to punch her when she asked for a day off. She said: “I forgot I had a dental appointment. When I asked Glenn, my boss, if I could have the next day off he told me that if I didn’t come into work he’d punch me in the jaw. He is a rather pathetic person who is threatened by strong women, all the staff laugh at him.”

The Tribunal also heard that Mrs Bray had recorded a Christmas single whilst already suspended for breaching her employer’s media rules by making public appearances without notifying her bosses.

The hearing continues.

If you have been unfairly dismissed and seek advice or assistance, please contact our Employment department on 01603 620508.

This article was produced on the 28th November 2011 by our Employment team for information purposes only and should not be construed or relied upon as specific legal advice.